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method

slice_when

Importance_2
Ruby latest stable (v2_5_5) - 0 notes - Class: Enumerable

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slice_when() public

Creates an enumerator for each chunked elements. The beginnings of chunks are defined by the block.

This method split each chunk using adjacent elements, elt_before and elt_after, in the receiver enumerator. This method split chunks between elt_before and elt_after where the block returns true.

The block is called the length of the receiver enumerator minus one.

The result enumerator yields the chunked elements as an array. So each method can be called as follows:

enum.slice_when { |elt_before, elt_after| bool }.each { |ary| ... }

Other methods of the Enumerator class and Enumerable module, such as to_a, map, etc., are also usable.

For example, one-by-one increasing subsequence can be chunked as follows:

a = [1,2,4,9,10,11,12,15,16,19,20,21]
b = a.slice_when {|i, j| i+1 != j }
p b.to_a #=> [[1, 2], [4], [9, 10, 11, 12], [15, 16], [19, 20, 21]]
c = b.map {|a| a.length < 3 ? a : "#{a.first}-#{a.last}" }
p c #=> [[1, 2], [4], "9-12", [15, 16], "19-21"]
d = c.join(",")
p d #=> "1,2,4,9-12,15,16,19-21"

Near elements (threshold: 6) in sorted array can be chunked as follows:

a = [3, 11, 14, 25, 28, 29, 29, 41, 55, 57]
p a.slice_when {|i, j| 6 < j - i }.to_a
#=> [[3], [11, 14], [25, 28, 29, 29], [41], [55, 57]]

Increasing (non-decreasing) subsequence can be chunked as follows:

a = [0, 9, 2, 2, 3, 2, 7, 5, 9, 5]
p a.slice_when {|i, j| i > j }.to_a
#=> [[0, 9], [2, 2, 3], [2, 7], [5, 9], [5]]

Adjacent evens and odds can be chunked as follows: (Enumerable#chunk is another way to do it.)

a = [7, 5, 9, 2, 0, 7, 9, 4, 2, 0]
p a.slice_when {|i, j| i.even? != j.even? }.to_a
#=> [[7, 5, 9], [2, 0], [7, 9], [4, 2, 0]]

Paragraphs (non-empty lines with trailing empty lines) can be chunked as follows: (See Enumerable#chunk to ignore empty lines.)

lines = ["foo\n", "bar\n", "\n", "baz\n", "qux\n"]
p lines.slice_when {|l1, l2| /\A\s*\z/ =~ l1 && /\S/ =~ l2 }.to_a
#=> [["foo\n", "bar\n", "\n"], ["baz\n", "qux\n"]]

Enumerable#chunk_while does the same, except splitting when the block returns false instead of true.

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