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Notes posted to Ruby on Rails

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November 28, 2016
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Track Changes To Your Model’s Data with Paper Trail Gem

Paper trail lets us track all the changes in the models data for the purpose of its editing and versioning. By using this gem, we can see how a model looks, at every stage of its life-cycle and we can take it back to any version of the model data and we can even undo all the changes after a record has been destroyed so as to restore it completely.

gempaper_trail’ run bundle install to install it

After bundle install you can run the following command for adding versions table to your database

bundle exec rails generate paper_trail:install

bundle exec rake db:migrate

Add has_paper_trail method to your models for tracking.

class Product < ActiveRecord::Base
 	has_paper_trail

end

If you are using a current_user method then you can track who is responsible for particular change by the below callback

class ApplicationController

before_action :set_paper_trail_whodunnit end

Features of paper trail gem

It stores each and every change happened in the model  like create, update and destroy
It does not store any updates unless if any modifications
It allows you to get every version including the actual and even once destroyed

Basic Usage

Now you have a versions method which returns all the changes in particular model

product = Product.find 2

product.versions

# [<PaperTrail::Version>, <PaperTrail::Version>, ...]

Based on the vesrion you can find the changes that happened in a model

v = product.versions.last

   v.event # it returns update / create / destroy
   v.whodunnit #it returns a user id who did this
   v.reify the poduct as it was before the update

you can navigate versions by using previous_version and next_version methods

product = product.previous_version

   product = product.next_version #it returns nil if there is no object

   product.versions.last.whodunnit #it returns the user who did the particular change

For More Read From Here : http://www.railscarma.com/blog/technical-articles/track-changes-models-data-paper-trail-gem/

November 8, 2016
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Ways of Handling PayPal Refunds in Rails

PayPal Checkout includes payment solutions ranging from simple to robust that let the merchants as well as developers choose an integration option that can be the best-suited for their website and customers. In order to integrate Paypal Payment Gateway, we need to do the following:

  1. Have a PayPal business or Premier account.

  2. Create a PayPal app and get an access token. When we create a PayPal app, PayPal generates a set of OAuth client_id and secret keys for the application. PayPal generates these keys for both the PayPal sandbox and Live environments. To get an access token, pass the client-id:secret credentials in the Authorization header. We use the access token for authentication when we make REST API requests.

  3. To perform an end-to-end test of our Express Checkout with In-Context integration, create both merchant and buyer accounts in the PayPal sandbox environment.

www.sandbox.paypal.com/in/webapps/mpp/home Merchant : Select the Business account type and enter an email address and password. Buyer : Select the Personal account type and enter a high PayPal balance, such as 5000.

Once we create Paypal sandbox account then click on the “Profile” link for that account, look under the tab “API Credentials”. We will have the following information;

Paypal API Username
Paypal API Signature
Paypal API Password

Note: When we are ready to go live we would just use the credentials from our real paypal account instead of the ones from our sandbox account. The credentials can be found in the “My Profile” area under the left hand tab “My Selling Tools” under the option “API access”

How to handle Paypal refunds in Rails:

Method 1:

Paypal Rest API;

For more complex merchant sites, direct calls to PayPal APIs for an Express Checkout integration may be a more appropriate integration. REST APIs — We can develop an Express Checkout integration using PayPal REST APIs.

To integrate the Express Checkout with In-Context flow; developer.paypal.com/docs/api/ OR PayPal REST API Ruby SDK (paypal-sdk-rest gem): The PayPal REST SDK provides Ruby APIs to create, process and manage payment.

Installation: Add the gem our application, in Gemfile:

gem 'paypal-sdk-rest'

And then execute:

$ bundle install

Configuration:

rails g paypal:sdk:install

Refunds a transaction: Any transaction we can issue a refund (Both direct and captured payments):

Refund a completed direct payment (sale)
Refund an authorized and captured payment (capture)

Refund a completed payment (sale): If we must refund a completed payment, or sale, provide the sale id given to us in response to a completed payment along with an empty JSON payload for a full refund and for partial refunds, we can instead include an amount object in the JSON payload.

curl -v https://api.sandbox.paypal.com/v1/payments /sale/CARMAXYZC6136044L/refund \
-H "Content-Type:application/json" \
-H "Authorization: Bearer Access-Token" \
-d '{}'

Note: We should substitute all call-specific parameters, such as tokens and IDs, with our own. Response state of the refund:

pending- The refund is pending.
completed- The refund has successfully completed.
failed- The refund failed.

Refund a captured payment; We can also refund a captured payment: API:

https://api.paypal.com/v1/payments/capture/{capture_id}/refund

Note: We must provide an amount object for both full and partial refunds.

curl -v https://api.sandbox.paypal.com/v1/payments/capture/CARMAXYZC6136044L/refund \
-H "Content-Type:application/json" \
-H "Authorization: Bearer Access-Token" \
-d '{
"amount":
{
"currency": "USD",
"total": "50.54"
},
"description": "This is the capture refund description."
}'

Reference: https://developer.paypal.com

Method 2:

Paypal refund by using Active Merchant Gem:

ActiveMerchant Integration: http://railscasts.com/episodes/145-integrating-active-merchant

In our Application;

config/environment/development.rb

config.after_initialize do

ActiveMerchant::Billing::Base.mode = :test
::GATEWAY = ActiveMerchant::Billing::PaypalGateway.new(
:login => "seller_1229899173_biz_api1.xyz.com",
:password => "FXWU58S7KXFC6HBE",
:signature =>AGjv6SW.mTiKxtkm6L9DcSUCUgePAUDQ3L- kTdszkPG8mRfjaRZDYtSu"

)

end

Refunds a transaction: Take a look into paypal_common_api.rb file in Active Merchant Gem;

https://github.com/activemerchant/active_merchant/blob/master/lib/active_merchant/billing/gateways/paypal/paypal_common_api.rb
  1. For a full refund pass nil for the amount:

gateway.refund nil, 'CARMAXYZC6136044L'

This will automatically make the :refund_type be “Full”.

  1. For a partial refund just pass the amount as usual:

gateway.refund 100, 'CARMAXYZC6136044L'
def refund(money, identification, options = {})
commit 'RefundTransaction', build_refund_request(money,  identification, options)
end

Ex:

Gateway.refund(nil,'CARMAXYZC6136044L') => Full Refund.

Gateway.refund(798,'CARMAXYZC6136044L') => Partial Refund.

Reference: http://www.rubydoc.info/github/Shopify/active_merchant/ActiveMerchant/Billing/PaypalCommonAPI

Method3: Read More From Here==> http://www.railscarma.com/blog/technical-articles/ways-handling-paypal-refunds-rails/

October 27, 2016 - (<= v3.2.13)
1 thank

An example, with expiration time set

e.g.:

Rails.cache.fetch("out_of_stock_products", :expires_in => 5.minutes) do
  Product.all.joins(:inventory).conditions.where("inventory.quantity = 0")
end
October 17, 2016
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How to generate & add sitemap to your Rails Application

Generate Sitemap: Required Gem: Sitemap generator:- github.com/kjvarga/sitemap_generator

SitemapGenerator is the easiest way to generate Sitemaps in Ruby. Rails integration provides access to the Rails route helpers within our sitemap config file and automatically makes the rake tasks available to us. Or if we prefer to use another framework, we can! We can use the rake tasks provided or run our sitemap configs as plain ruby scripts.

Sitemaps XML format:

The Sitemap protocol format consists of XML tags. All data values in a Sitemap must be entity-escaped. The file itself must be UTF-8 encoded.

The Sitemap must: Begin with an opening <urlset> tag and end with a closing </urlset> tag. Specify the namespace (protocol standard) within the <urlset> tag. Include a <url> entry for each URL, as a parent XML tag. Include a <loc> child entry for each <url> parent tag.

All other tags are optional. Also, all URLs in a Sitemap must be from a single host, such as www.xyz.com or estore.xyz.com. For more details: http://www.sitemaps.org/protocol.html

How to add a sitemap to a Rails app:

1, View for your sitemap:

# app/views/mysitemap/index.xml.erb

2, At your Controller: Let it be our object in view is @articles variable. It needs to get that from a mysitemap controller:

# app/controllers /mysitemap_controller.rb
MysitemapController <  ApplicationController
 layout nil
  def index
 headers['Content-Type'] =  'application/xml'
respond_to do |format|
 format.xml {@articles =  Article.all}
 end
 end
 end			

3, Add a route:

# config/routes.rb
get 'sitemap.xml', :to =>  'sitemap#index', :defaults =>  {:format  => 'xml'}

How to convert XML file to HTML: Read From Here http://goo.gl/Vp3chb

October 3, 2016
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How To Generate a Swagger Docs For Rails API

Making API for a Rails application is simple for a Ruby on Rails developer. In any case, how different clients/customers will know whether the API is working fine or not without a customer side application. Is there any answer for this which I can report for API inside the Rails application, The answer is yes we have numerous instruments and methodologies however I would favor swagger UI.

In this article I am going to disclose how to make Rails API documentation using swagger UI.

Prerequisites:- I am going to use one sample posts application which serves API calls.

Gem:- To Integrate swagger UI for Rails API I am using a gem called swagger-docs. Add this gem to your Gemfile in your application and do bundle install.

Swagger initializer file:- After bundling the gem create an initializer in config/initializers(e.g. swagger.rb) and specify the following options:

#File config/initializers/swagger.rb

Swagger::Docs::Config.register_apis({

"1.0" => {

# the extension used for the API

:api_extension_type => :json,

# the output location where your .json files are written  to

:api_file_path => "public/apidocs",

# the URL base path to your API

:base_path => "http://localhost:3000",

# if you want to delete all .json files at each generation

:clean_directory => true,

# add custom attributes to api-docs

:attributes => {

:info => {

"title" => "Your application title",

"description" => "Rails API documention with Swagger UI.",

"termsOfServiceUrl" => "",

"contact" => ""

}

}

}

})

Refer below url for the list of configarations

https://github.com/richhollis/swagger-docs#configuration-options

swagger_controller and swagger_API are helpers to provide swagger UI documentation.

module Api

module V1

class PostsController < ApplicationController

respond_to :json

swagger_controller :posts, 'Post Controller'

swagger_api :create do

summary 'Creating posts'

notes 'Should be used for creating posts'

param :form, 'post[name]', :string, :required, 'name'

param :form, 'post[publish]', :boolean, :required, 'publish'

end

swagger_api :index do

summary 'Get all the posts'

notes 'Should be used for fetching all posts'

param :header, :Authoraization, :string, :required, 'Authoraization'

response :unauthorized

response :ok, "Success"

end

swagger_api :show do

summary 'Get all the posts'

notes 'Should be used for fetching a post'

param :path, :id, :string, :id

response :unauthorized

response :ok, "Success"

end

swagger_api :destroy do

summary 'Destroy the post'

notes 'Should be used for destroying a post'

param :path, :id, :string, :id

response :unauthorized

response :ok, "Success"

end

end

end

end

Read More From Here http://goo.gl/dMVHon

September 23, 2016 - (<= v4.0.2)
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Usage of SQL and NoSQL Databases in single rails application(MySQL, PostgreSQL and MongoDB)

There are distinctive reasons why you should think about having various databases in your Ruby on Rails application. In my situation, I expected to store large quantities of data.

Consider default database is MySQL. In our application database.yml file write connections for MySQL in normal way. After that, for connecting postgresql in the same application we need to create custom files.

Create the custom database files to connect postgresql

We’re going to set up a second database called “Stats”

First of all, create the file config/database_stats.yml and populate it as you do with the primary database’s config file.

Your file will look something like this:

development:
adapter: postgresql
encoding: utf8
reconnect: false
database: db_info_development
pool: 5
host: localhost
username: postgres
password:

We’re now going to create a directory that will hold the schema and all the migrations of the Stats database.

Create directory with name db_stats in the rails root and copy the structure as mentioned below

dbmigrate
schema.rb
seeds.rbdb_statsmigrate
schema.rb
seeds.rb

The created files should be empty.

Add Rake Tasks

For handling stats database, we need to write custom tasks for creation, migrations and other functionalities.

Create a file lib/tasks/db_stats.rake with the below content

namespace :stats do

namespace :db do |ns|

task :drop do
Rake::Task[“db:drop”].invoke
end

task :create do
Rake::Task[“db:create”].invoke
end

task :setup do
Rake::Task[“db:setup”].invoke
end

task :migrate do
Rake::Task[“db:migrate”].invoke
end

task :rollback do
Rake::Task[“db:rollback”].invoke
end

task :seed do
Rake::Task[“db:seed”].invoke
end

task :version do
Rake::Task[“db:version”].invoke
end

namespace :schema do
task :load do
Rake::Task[“db:schema:load”].invoke
end

task :dump do
Rake::Task[“db:schema:dump”].invoke
end
end

namespace :test do
task :prepare do
Rake::Task[“db:test:prepare”].invoke
end
end

# append and prepend proper tasks to all the tasks as defined above

ns.tasks.each do |task|
task.enhance [“stats:set_custom_config”] do
Rake::Task[“stats:revert_to_original_config”].invoke
end
end
end

task :set_custom_config do

# save current vars

@original_config = {
env_schema: ENV[‘SCHEMA’],
config: Rails.application.config.dup
}

# set config variables for custom database

ENV[‘SCHEMA’] =db_stats/schema.rb”
Rails.application.config.paths[‘db’] = [“db_stats”]
Rails.application.config.paths[‘db/migrate’] = [“db_stats/migrate”]
Rails.application.config.paths[‘db/seeds’] = [“db_stats/seeds.rb”]
Rails.application.config.paths[‘config/database’] = [“config/database_stats.yml”]
end

task :revert_to_original_config do
# reset config variables to original values
ENV[‘SCHEMA’] = @original_config[:env_schema]
Rails.application.config = @original_config[:config]
end
end

Once all of this setup is done, we can create the stats database and run its first migration:

$ rake stats:db:create
$ rake stats:db:migrate

This will generate the Stats database schema file in db_stats/schema.rb.

Add a custom migration generator We cannot use rails generator because the path hardcodes the db/migrate. Read more From Here http://goo.gl/jVCVRJ

September 13, 2016 - (v3.2.1 - v4.2.7)
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Search Kick Gem – To Make Your Search Intelligent On Rails App

Search kick Gem is a Ruby gem that runs on top of Elasticsearch and makes it easy to make searches in a Rails-friendly fashion. In addition, it allows you to add more features including analytics, autocomplete, and personalized results. Searchkick realizes what your users are searching for. As more individuals hunt, it gets more brilliant and the outcomes improve. It’s benevolent for designers – and supernatural for your users. It handles stemming, special characters, extra whitespace, misspellings, custom synonyms. To get started, make sure that you have Elasticsearch installed on your home computer. Depending on your operating system, the installation process is slightly different and make sure you have at least Java 7. Once you have that done, add and install searchick to your Rails application by adding the following to your Gemfile and running bundle install.

gemsearchkick’

When you have both installed and ready to go, you need to indicate which models you might want to be able to search through in your application. Just add searchkick to the model file to make it work. Then, we need to reindex the models so that Elasticsearch can run properly. In your terminal, run:

rake searchkick:reindex:all

Seeking with searchkick is entirely straightforward. Basically run YourModel.search, trailed by the parameters of the search and any filters that you want to add on. For instance, one of more complex searches is below:

 @offers = Offer.search params[:search],
 page: params[:page], per_page: 10,
 order: {starttime: :desc},
 fields: [{offer_name: :word_start}, 
 {            
offer_request_name: :word_start}:price],
 where: {
 starttime: {
 gte: DateTime.strptime(params[:fromdate],‘%m/%d%Y’),
 lte: DateTime.strptime(params[:todate],‘%m/%d/%)
 }
 }

In this search, we take the search query of the user with params[:search], and look through of the lessons with the following conditions:

Read More From Here : http://www.railscarma.com/blog/technical-articles/search-kick-gem-to-make-your-search-intelligent-on-rails-app/

September 1, 2016
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Previewing Emails in Rails Applications With the Mail_View Gem

Sending an email from an application through a development or staging environment can be cumbersome especially when you want to preview the mail before you hit the send button. With the gem ‘mail_view, you can easily preview emails right from your development environment. Previewing mail is important to ensure that you are sending the right email and to the right person.

Never send a mail in dark anymore with the ‘mail_view gem! Check out more below on how it can be implemented in your application during the development stage.

Rails Email Preview helps us to quickly view the email in web browser in development mode.

  1. Add “gem ‘rails_email_preview’, ‘~> 0.2.29’ “ to gem file and bundle install.

  2. Run “rails g rails_email_preview:install” this creates initializer in config folder and add routes.

  3. Run “rails g rails_email_preview:update_previews” this crates mailer_previews folder in app directory.

Generator will add a stub to each of your emails, then u populate the stub with mock data.

Ex:

class UserMailerPreview
def invitation
UserMailer.invitation mock_user(‘Alice’), mock_user(‘Bob’)
end

def welcome
UserMailer.welcome mock_user
end

private
def mock_user(name =Bill Gates’)
fake_id User.new(name: name, email:user#{rand 100}@test.com”)
end

def fake_id(obj)
obj.define_singleton_method(:id) { 123 + rand(100) }
obj
end
end
  1. Parameters in search query will be available as an instance variable to preview class.

Ex: if we have a URL like “/emails/user_mailer_preview-welcome?user_id=1” @user_id is defined in welcome method of UserMailerPreview it helps us to send mail to specific user.

class UserMailerPreview
def welcome
user = @user_id ? User.find(@user_id) : mock_user
UserMailer.welcome(user)
end
end
  1. To access REP url’s like this

    rails_email_preview.rep_root_url
    rails_email_preview.rep_emails_url
    rails_email_preview.rep_email_url(‘user_mailer-welcome’)
    
  2. We can send emails via REP, this will use environment mailer settings. Uncomment this line in the initializer to disable sending mail in test environment.

    config.enable_send_email = false
    

References :

  1. github.com/glebm/rails_email_preview

  2. richonrails.com/articles/action-mailer-previews-in-ruby-on-rails-4-1

Read More From Here>>> http://goo.gl/KQBk5S

August 21, 2016
1 thank

Integrate enum with PostgreSQL Enumerated Types

Extract from:

http://www.sitepoint.com/enumerated-types-with-activerecord-and-postgresql/

There are 2 things that we need to do before we can use ActiveRecord::Enum with PostgreSQL Enumerated Types: database migration and enum declaration.

First, let’s create the database migration:

$ bundle exec rails generate migration AddGenderToUsers gender:gender

Next, edit the generated migration to add the type:

# db/migrate/20150619131527_add_gender_to_users.rb
class AddGenderToUsers < ActiveRecord::Migration
  def up
    execute <<-SQL
      CREATE TYPE gender AS ENUM ('male', 'female', 'not_sure', 'prefer_not_to_disclose');
    SQL

    add_column :users, :gender, :gender, index: true
  end

  def down
    remove_column :users, :gender

    execute <<-SQL
      DROP TYPE gender;
    SQL
  end
end

Once you’re finished with that, run the migration:

$ bundle exec rake db:migrate

Now, we have completed the database migration. The next step is to declare an enum in the User model. Earlier, we used both the Array and Hash forms to declare an enum. For the integration to work, we need to declare an enum using the Hash form:

# app/models/user.rb
class User < ActiveRecord::Base
  enum gender: {
    male:                   'male',
    female:                 'female',
    not_sure:               'not_sure',
    prefer_not_to_disclose: 'prefer_not_to_disclose'
  }
end

Finally, we can store ActiveRecord::Enum values using PostgreSQL Enumerated Types. As a bonus, all helper methods provided by ActiveRecord::Enum still work as expected.

August 18, 2016
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July 25, 2016
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July 19, 2016 - (v4.2.1)
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July 12, 2016
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June 8, 2016
0 thanks

SOCKET LIBRARY IN RUBY ON RAILS

There are basically two levels of accessing network services in case of rails .

The socket and network libraries are such important parts of integrating Ruby applications with the Internet and other communications-based environments.

One is through socket libraries provide low level access to connection oriented and connection-less protocols. Where user can implement client and server connection. Ruby is also having Network libraries that provide users a high level access to specific network protocols like FTP,HTTP and Etc.

At a low level, you can access the basic socket support in the underlying operating system, which allows you to implement clients and servers for both connection-oriented and connectionless protocols. Ruby also has libraries that provide higher-level access to specific application-level network protocols, such as FTP, HTTP, and so on.

What are Sockets?

Sockets are basically a bidirectional communications channel. Sockets may communicate within a process, between processes on the same machine, or between processes on different continents. Sockets can be implemented on different channels : Unix domain sockets, TCP, UDP, and so on. The socket library mainly provides specific classes and interface for handling a transports.

A SimpleClient:

Hereis a very basic client program which will open up a connection to a given port and given host. Ruby class TCPSocket provides open function to open a socket. The TCPSocket.open(hosname, port ) opens a TCP connection to hostname & theport.

Once socket is open, you can actually read that particular thing like IO object. When it’s done, just remember to close it, as you close that file. The following code connects to a given host and port, reads any available data from the socket, and then exits:

require ‘socket’ # Socket in standard library

hostname = ‘localhost’

port = 8080

s = TCPSocket.open(hostname, port)

while line = s.gets # Gets and Read the lines from the socket

puts line.chop # And print with platform line terminator end

s.close # socket Closed

A Simple Server: To write Internet servers, we basically use this TCPServer class. A TCPServer object is a factory for TCPSocket objects. Now call TCPServer.open(hostname, port function to specify a port for your service and create a TCPServer object. Next, call the accept method of the returned TCPServer object. This particular method waits till client connects to the port you specified above, and then returns a TCPSocket object that basically represents the connection to that client.

require ‘socket’ # Get sockets from stdlib server = TCPServer.open(8080) # Socket to listen on port 8080 loop { # Servers run forever

client = server.accept       # Wait for a client to connect
client.puts(Time.now.ctime)  # Send the time to the client
client.puts "Closing the connection. Bye!"
client.close                 # Disconnect from the client

}

Now run this server in background and then run above client to see the result.

June 7, 2016
0 thanks

foreign_key option

It is also possible to specify that add_foreign_key should be added to the schema:

add_reference(:products, :supplier, foreign_key: true)
May 25, 2016
0 thanks

Active Record Import

With activerecord-import, you’d just add your records to an array and call import:

records_to_import = pricing_data.map do |location, price|
  Inventory.new(location: location, price: price) 
end

Inventory.import records_to_import 
May 25, 2016
0 thanks
May 25, 2016 - (v1.0.0 - v3.1.0)
0 thanks
May 19, 2016 - (>= v4.1.8)
0 thanks

Careful with arel column

I use what @equivalent suggests a lot but be careful, you MUST state the direction otherwise methods like take/last/first will fail silently!

StatusChange.arel_table[‘created_at’]. asc

not:

StatusChange.arel_table[‘created_at’]

April 12, 2016
0 thanks

`value` or `text` method with parameter.

If your value or text method requires a parameter, like to_s(:select) then you need to create a separate method that references that in your model, like:

def to_s_select
  to_s(:select)
end

You can’t pass it in as a string like 'to_s(:select)'.

You have to use :to_s_select or 'to_s_select'.

March 23, 2016
1 thank

RE: RE: FALSE: Creates record by given attributes only if table is empty

keredson is still a little off on the behavior.

>> Where in reality this would grab the “first” record (say w/ email “john@smith.com”), and change its email to “derek@somwhere.com”, a fairly surprising action that doesn’t obviously fail, leading to some pretty subtle bugs.

This isn’t right, as if you look at the source it calls: “first || create(attributes, &block)”

So in the example of:

User.first_or_create(email: 'derek@somwhere.com')

it would find the first user with any email, and return it. And thats it. The attributes passed in as params are only used in the event that first returns no matches, and create is called.

I’m using it in a way similar to:

Foo.where(bar: baz_params[:bar]).first_or_create(baz_params)

This will find the first Foo where bar is equal to the bar sent from baz_params. If none is found, it will create it. It’s useful for me when importing large amounts of data where I know there will be duplicate records.

March 21, 2016
1 thank

Should include information about optional block

If a block exists, will return true if any records in the relation is true for the given block. Otherwise, returns true is there are any records.

March 21, 2016
0 thanks

Description

Selects the first record within a relation if it exists, otherwise creates a new record with the optional attributes.

March 17, 2016
0 thanks

No grammatical error

rajivekjain:

“A, B, and C” is correct in English, and is preferred by most style manuals. “A, B and C” is also correct in English. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Serial_comma

March 17, 2016 - (>= v4.2.1)
0 thanks

Default values

By default :on_update and :on_delete have :restrict value.

March 11, 2016 - (>= v4.0.2)
1 thank

Ordering on associations using merge

For ordering on the attribute of an associated model you can add joins to query and merge order scope:

Product.joins(:category).merge(Category.order(priority: :desc))
March 6, 2016
3 thanks

RE: FALSE: Creates record by given attributes only if table is empty

Dino’s comment was almost certainly due to a misunderstanding of the API, a mistake I made myself the first time I used it, and one I’ve witnessed multiple others make as well.

The fact that this method takes an attributes parameter leads one to think the passed params are the criteria for the selection. At first glance it would appear it would be used like this:

User.first_or_create(email: 'derek@somwhere.com')

Where in reality this would grab the “first” record (say w/ email “john@smith.com”), and change its email to “derek@somwhere.com”, a fairly surprising action that doesn’t obviously fail, leading to some pretty subtle bugs.

In reality it should be used like this:

User.where(email: 'derek@somwhere.com').first_or_create

And the attributes param. isn’t used in 99% of use cases. (If at all - the provision for the block that executes only on create fully duplicates what the attributes parameter can do in a much more obvious way.)

IMHO this is simply a bad API that one just needs to be aware of. But it’s unfair to knock dino for what’s likely a highly common misreading.

March 4, 2016 - (>= v4.0.2)
0 thanks

FALSE: Creates record by given attributes only if table is empty

I very much doubt that dino’s comment was ever correct, but it certainly isn’t correct now. The behavior liantics describes is correct.