Flowdock

Notes posted by ColinDKelley

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October 26, 2012 - (v1.2.0 - v3.2.8)
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is now a subclass of Hash that preserves order (or _is_ a Hash if running Ruby 1.9 or greater)

You might not realize it preserves order because it delegates inspect to its super-class, Hash, which doesn’t preserve order. But you will see that order is preserved if you iterate or use the keys or values methods:

>> names = ['Amy Irving', 'Jane Doe', 'John Doe', 'John Updike', 'Susan Anthony']
>> ordered = names.group_by { |name| name.split.first }
=> #<OrderedHash {"John"=>["John Doe", "John Updike"], "Amy"=>["Amy Irving"], "Susan"=>["Susan Anthony"], "Jane"=>["Jane Doe"]}>

# (note that the inspect above is in undefined order)

>> ordered.keys                          # will be ordered properly
=> ["Amy", "Jane", "John", "Susan"]

>> ordered.each { |first, full| puts first; full.each { |name| puts "  #{name}" } }  # will be ordered properly
Amy
  Amy Irving
Jane
  Jane Doe
John
  John Doe
  John Updike
Susan
  Susan Anthony
December 8, 2010
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typo

ActionController::Steaming => ActionController::Streaming

June 25, 2010
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can return nil

I was surprised to get nil back when the right hand side (RHS) was nil. (I was expecting an exception.)

>> "abc" <=> nil
=> nil

Looking at the source I find you’ll get nil back in several cases when the RHS isn’t a string.

  • If the RHS doesn’t implement to_str.

  • If the RHS doesn’t implement <=>.

Assuming the RHS does implement to_str and <=>, the code delegates to the RHS and negates the result:

return - (rhs <=> self)
June 17, 2010
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writes the file to disk even if you pass a block

I was surprised to find that the local file is opened and written even if you pass the block. If you’re local working directory isn’t writeable or doesn’t have the space, you’re out of luck.

June 17, 2010
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writes the file to disk even if you pass a block

I was surprised to find that the local file is opened and written even if you pass the block. If you’re local working directory isn’t writeable or doesn’t have the space, you’re out of luck.

June 4, 2010
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database exceptions will still be raised

Note that save() only returns false on validation errors (when valid? returns false). If other errors occur at the database level, like a database deadlock or trying to insert null into a column that doesn’t allow it, that will still raise an exception.

February 23, 2010
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note: the example format regex is too lenient

The example regex for RFC 2822 email is too lenient. Sure it’s just an example, but it wound up in our code and we just had to fix it to match the RFC.

The regex as given allows any non-@ non-whitespace characters. But the RFC only allows these characters in mailbox names

alpha digit - ! \ # $ % & ' * + \ / = ? ^ _ ` { | } ~ ] +

and . is only allowed between atoms of 1 or more of the above.

Here’s the corrected regex:

:with => /\A([-a-z0-9!\#$%&'*+\/=?^_`{|}~]+\.)*[-a-z0-9!\#$%&'*+\/=?^_`{|}~]+@((?:[-a-z0-9]+\.)+[a-z]{2,})\Z/i
January 26, 2010 - (>= v2.3.2)
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is now a subclass of Hash that preserves order (or _is_ a Hash if running Ruby 1.9 or greater)

You might not realize it preserves order because it delegates inspect to its super-class, Hash, which doesn’t preserve order. But you will see that order is preserved if you iterate or use the keys or values methods:

>> names = ['Amy Irving', 'Jane Doe', 'John Doe', 'John Updike', 'Susan Anthony']
>> ordered = names.group_by { |name| name.split.first }
=> #<OrderedHash {"John"=>["John Doe", "John Updike"], "Amy"=>["Amy Irving"], "Susan"=>["Susan Anthony"], "Jane"=>["Jane Doe"]}>

>> ordered.keys
=> ["Amy", "Jane", "John", "Susan"]

>> ordered.each { |first, full| puts first; full.each { |name| puts "  "+name } }
Amy
  Amy Irving
Jane
  Jane Doe
John
  John Doe
  John Updike
Susan
  Susan Anthony
January 26, 2010 - (>= v2.3.2)
2 thanks

returns an ActiveSupport::OrderedHash

Returns an ActiveSupport::OrderedHash, which is a subclass of Hash that preserves order. If you’re running Ruby 1.9, it is simply an alias for Hash. Surprisingly, you might not realize that OrderedHash is preserving order since it delegates its inspect method to Hash. More at ActiveSupport::OrderedHash.