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March 4, 2009
10 thanks

Differences between normal or-assign operator

Differences between this method and normal memoization with ||=:

  • memoize works with false/nil values

  • Potential arguments are memoized

Take the following example:

def allowed?
  @allowed ||= begin
    # Big calculation
    puts "Worked"
    false
  end
end

allowed? # Outputs "Worked"
allowed? # Outputs "Worked" again

Since @allowed is set to false (this is also applicable with nil), the ||= operator will move on the the next statement and will not be short-circuited.

When you use memoize you will not have this problem.

def allowed?
  # Big calculation
  puts "Worked"
  false
end
memoize :allowed?

allowed? # Outputs "Worked"
allowed? # No output

Now, look at the case where we have parameters:

def random(max=10)
  @random ||= rand(max)
end

random     # => 4
random     # => 4 -- Yay!
random(20) # => 4 -- Oops!

Better use memoize again!

def random(max=10)
  rand(max)
end
memoize :random

random     # => 6
random     # => 6 -- Yay!
random(20) # => 12 -- Double-Yay!
random     # => 6 -- Head a'splode
March 4, 2009
5 thanks

Usage

This defines attr_accessors at a class level instead of instance level.

class Foo
  cattr_accessor :greeting
end

Foo.greeting = "Hello"

This could be compared to, but is not the same as doing this:

class Bar
  class << self
    attr_accessor :greeting
  end
end

Bar.greeting = "Hello"

The difference might not be apparent at first, but cattr_accessor will make the accessor inherited to the instances:

Foo.new.greeting #=> "Hello"
Bar.new.greeting # NoMethodError: undefined method `greeting' for #<Bar:0x18e4d78>

This inheritance is also not copy-on-write in case you assumed that:

Foo.greeting  #=> "Hello"
foo1, foo2 = Foo.new, Foo.new

foo1.greeting = "Hi!"

Foo.greeting  #=> "Hi!"
foo2.greeting #=> "Hi!"

This makes it possible to share common state (queues, semaphores, etc.), configuration (max value, etc.) or temporary values through this.

February 27, 2009
6 thanks

Extend with an anonymous module

You can extend with an anonymous module for one-off cases that won’t be repeated:

belongs_to :container, :polymorphic => true, :extend => ( Module.new do
    def find_target
      ...
    end
  end )

The parentheses are important, will fail silently without them.

February 24, 2009
9 thanks

Specialized versions of find with method_missing

Check ActiveRecord::Base.method_missing for documentation on the family of “magic” find methods (find_by_x, find_all_by_x, find_or_create_by_x, etc.).

February 24, 2009 - (>= v2.2.1)
5 thanks

ATM does not work in Rails 2.3 Edge

add to test/spec_helper to make it work again…

#spec_helper / test_helper
include ActionController::TestProcess
February 23, 2009 - (>= v2.0.0)
5 thanks

Nested with_options

You can nest with_options blocks, and you can even use the same name for the block parameter each time. E.g.:

class Product
  with_options :dependent => :destroy do |product|
    product.with_options :class_name => 'Media' do |product|
      product.has_many :images, :conditions => {:content_type => 'image'}
      product.has_many :videos, :conditions => {:content_type => 'video'}
    end

    product.has_many :comments
  end
end
February 22, 2009
3 thanks

CAUTION! :frequency option description is misleading

To use event-based observer, don’t supply :frequency param at all. :frequency => 0 causes JS error.

Use this option only if time-based observer is what you need.

February 20, 2009
5 thanks

Static and dynamic attachments

You can attach static files directly:

attachment :content_type => "image/jpeg", :body => File.read("someimage.jpg")

and you can also define attachments dynamically by using a block:

attachment "text/csv" do |a|
  a.body = my_data.to_csv
end
February 18, 2009
4 thanks

Turn off for individual controllers/actions

To disable protection for all actions in your controller use skip_before_filter:

skip_before_filter :verify_authenticity_token

You can also pass :only and :except to disable protection for specific actions, e.g:

skip_before_filter :verify_authenticity_token, :only => :index
February 17, 2009
4 thanks

Date_select with assert_valid_keys

If you are using date_select with assert_valid_keys you have to allow 3 parameters named field(1i), field(2i) and field(3i).

For example with field

date_select("post", "written_on")

You have to allow following fields:

params[:post].assert_valid_keys( 
  'written_on(1i)', 'written_on(2i)', 'written_on(3i)'
)
February 17, 2009
9 thanks

Empty elements

If you want to output an empty element (self-closed) like “br”, “img” or “input”, use the tag method instead.

February 13, 2009
3 thanks

New test syntax

You can use either one and even mix in the same test case if you want:

class Test < Test::Unit::TestCase
  # old way to define a test method (prefix with test_)
  def test_should_be_valid_without_content
    assert Comment.new.valid?
  end

  # new way to define a test
  test "should be valid without content" do
    assert Comment.new.valid?
  end
end
February 10, 2009
8 thanks

Security issue with non-HTML formats

Please note that using default to_xml or to_json methods can lead to security holes, as these method expose all attributes of your model by default, including salt, crypted_password, permissions, status or whatever you might have.

You might want to override these methods in your models, e.g.:

def to_xml
  super( :only => [ :login, :first_name, :last_name ] )
end

Or consider not using responds_to at all, if you only want to provide HTML.

February 9, 2009
5 thanks
February 7, 2009 - (>= v2.2.1)
3 thanks

Deprecated

This method is deprecated. You should use:

I18n.translate('activerecord.errors.messages')
February 3, 2009
3 thanks

Possible gotcha

Please note that exists? doesn’t hold all the conventions of find, i.e. you can’t do:

Person.exists?(:conditions => ['name LIKE ?', "%#{query}%"]) # DOESN'T WORK!
February 3, 2009
3 thanks

Nothing here

You’re probably looking for I18n::Backend::Simple.

February 3, 2009
4 thanks

This method will still rewrite all the values of the table

Even if you update only a small boolean flag on your record, update_attribute will generate an UPDATE statement that will include all the fields of the record, including huge BLOB and TEXT columns. Take this in account.

February 1, 2009 - (v2.2.1)
3 thanks

You can't use Symbols, but you can use Regexps

You can’t use Symbol (although Symbol is accepted with render :action => :new), like:

assert_template :new # WON'T WORK!

But you can use Regexp, e.g.:

assert_template /new/ # WORKS OK

Note that the String matched with your Regexp is the full path to the template relative to the view/ directory of your app, so this will not work:

assert_template /^new$/ # WON'T WORK!

However this might:

assert_template /^employees\/new.html.haml$/
January 30, 2009 - (v1.2.0 - v2.1.0)
3 thanks

Hash conditions require explicit key and value

When condition passed as hash, the behavior is different from a finder method. Finder methods, such as:

find(:all, :user=>user)

will apply the user_id = user.id convention, provided user is an association (e.g. belongs_to :user). The exists? method will not do the same. You must specify the foreign key name and value explicitly, i.e:

exists?(:user_id=>user.id)
January 27, 2009 - (>= v2.2.1)
5 thanks

Getting the object in a partial

If you need to get the object for the form inside a partial, and can’t use the instance variable, use the #object method… This is particularly useful when you’re dealing with single-table inheritance subclasses (e.g. MyOtherClass inherits from MyClass) or when you are using the same partial across different controllers.

new.html.erb

<% form_for(@my_object) do %>
  <%= render :partial => 'form' %>
  <%= submit_tag 'Create' %>
<% end %>

_form.html.erb

<% if f.object.class.is_a? MyClass %>
 <%# do something... %>
<% elsif f.object.is_a? MyOtherClass %>
  <%# do something else... %>
<% end %>
January 27, 2009
5 thanks

Use collect in nested content_tags

Remember to use #collect instead of #each in nested content_tags

arr = ['a','b','c']
content_tag :div do 
  arr.collect { |letter| content_tag(:scan, letter) 
end
#=> <div>
#      <scan>a</scan>
#      <scan>b</scan>
#      <scan>c</scan>
#   </div>

If you used #each you would get this (which is probably a mistake):

#=> <div>
#      abc
#   </div>
January 26, 2009
5 thanks

two ways to disable single table inheritance

  1. Don’t use the column name ‘type’

  2. Or if the first is no option for you: Tell Rails to look for a not existing column like:

class MyModel < ActiveRecord::Base

  # disable STI
  inheritance_column = :_type_disabled
end  
January 26, 2009 - (>= v2.2.1)
3 thanks

alternative (working with 2.2.X)

ActionController::Base.relative_url_root

January 25, 2009
3 thanks

Routes = RouteSet.new

In config/routes.rb you can see this:

ActionController::Routing::Routes.draw do |map|
  #routes
end

If you want to look at the code in ActionController::Routing you won’t find the definition of Routes. That’s because it’s actually an instance of the class RouteSet, defined in action_controller/routing.rb

Routes = RouteSet.new
January 24, 2009
8 thanks

How to test different responses of respond_to

You can shorten this:

@request.env['HTTP_ACCEPT'] = "application/rss"

To this:

@request.accept = "application/rss"

Also, if you send more than one Mime type, it will render the first one:

@request.accept = "text/javascript, text/html" #=> renders JS
@request.accept = "text/html, text/javascript" #=> renders HTML
January 22, 2009
7 thanks

Using fields_for with has_many associations

If you want to edit each element of an array of objects (such as with a has_many type association), you will need to include “[]” in your field parameter name, like so:

<% fields_for "object[]" do |subfield| -%>
  [...]
 <% end -%>

Because you named the field parameter “object[]”, fields_for will assume you have an instance variable @object to use for the fields’ values. To fake this, you can do something like:

<% objects.each do |@object| -%>
  <% fields_for "object[]" do |subfield| -%>
    [...]
  <% end -%>
<% end -%>

If that looks like sacrilegious Rails code to you, then you could consider:

<% objects.each do |object| -%>
  <% fields_for "object[]", object do |subfield| -%>
    [...]
  <% end -%>
<% end -%>

In either case, params[:object] will be a hash where the ID of each object (determined via ActiveRecord::Base#to_param ) is associated with a hash of its new values:

params = { 'object' => { '123' => { 'field' => 'newval' }, '159' => { 'field' => 'newval' } } }
January 20, 2009 - (>= v2.2.1)
5 thanks

Reloading memoized values

Memoize is used to cache the result of a method. It’s roughly equivalent of having:

def memoized_method(*args)
  @result[args] ||= (
    # do calculation here
  )
end

However, the result is cached so that it’s not calculated for every request.

To recalculate cached value use either

obj.memoized_method(:reload)

or

obj.memoized_method(true)