Flowdock

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February 16, 2009
5 thanks

Usage example

Some examples:

# Remove even numbers
(1..30).reject { |n| n % 2 == 0 }
# => [1, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 13, 15, 17, 19, 21, 23, 25, 27, 29]

# Remove years dividable with 4 (this is *not* the full leap years rule)
(1950..2000).reject { |y| y % 4 != 0 }
# => [1952, 1956, 1960, 1964, 1968, 1972, 1976, 1980, 1984, 1988, 1992, 1996, 2000]

# Remove users with karma below arithmetic mean
total = users.inject(0) { |total, user| total += user.karma }
mean = total / users.size
good_users = users.reject { |u| u.karma < mean }
February 16, 2009
1 thank

Reverse of this

If you want to do the reverse of this, e.g. go from a specific date and back to a certain day of the previous week, you can implement it like this:

def last_week(day = :monday)
  days_into_week = { :monday => 0, :tuesday => 1, :wednesday => 2, :thursday => 3, :friday => 4, :saturday => 5, :sunday => 6}
  result = (self - 7).beginning_of_week + days_into_week[day]
  self.acts_like?(:time) ? result.change(:hour => 0) : result
end

If you do not want to make your own method of this, but just want to do it in a regular chaining of date methods (like Date.today.next_year.at_midnight), you can do it like the following:

(date - 7).next_week(:tuesday) # Tuesday, last week

Please note that you just need to subtract 7 if you want to move back a week. Only use these methods if you want to go to a specific day of the week.

February 16, 2009
1 thank

Reverse naming

The reverse of this is last_month and not previous_month, like one might believe from the naming.

February 16, 2009
1 thank

Reverse naming

The reverse of this is last_year and not previous_year, like one might believe from the naming.

February 15, 2009
0 thanks

use #collect instead of #each

The earlier reminder to use #collect instead of #each applies regardless of whether the tag is nested or not.

This is counterintuitive, as #collect returns an array of strings of HTML tags, but ActionView renders it properly.

February 14, 2009
1 thank

Clear and simple rescue

noxyu3m, your code is rescuing all exceptions, not just ActiveRecord::RecordInvalid.

I think this syntax is a bit more clear than using the global variable.

def create
  @model = Model.new(params[:model)
  @model.save!
rescue => err                          # rescues all exceptions
  logger.error(err.to_s)
end
February 14, 2009
0 thanks

Simple rescue

Take it easy:

def create
  @model = Model.new(params[:model)
  @model.save!
rescue
  logger.error(!$.to_s)
end

Global variable !$ refers to the Exception object.

February 13, 2009
1 thank

throws exception

when use use Model.find([1,2,3,4])

throws exception if no record exists with any of this ID

February 13, 2009
3 thanks

New test syntax

You can use either one and even mix in the same test case if you want:

class Test < Test::Unit::TestCase
  # old way to define a test method (prefix with test_)
  def test_should_be_valid_without_content
    assert Comment.new.valid?
  end

  # new way to define a test
  test "should be valid without content" do
    assert Comment.new.valid?
  end
end
February 12, 2009
4 thanks

Real life use

If you’re wondering what the base64 format is used for, here are some examples:

  • HTTP Basic authentication: encode your username and password as one string, and add it as a header of an HTTP request. When a page requiring basic authentication gets called from a browser it results in a generic Username/Password dialog from that browser. See also http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Basic_access_authentication

  • Encode the binary content of images to base64 and embed it in XML documents, for example in web services

  • For more information see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Base64

Just note that the encoded (character) data is about 30% larger than un-encoded (binary) data.

February 12, 2009
0 thanks

using collection=objects

It will fire one insert query per new record

February 12, 2009
4 thanks

Binary files

Another real important flag is b when dealing with binary files. For example to download an mp3 from the internet you need to pass the b flag or the data will be screwed up:

# Downloads a binary file from the internet
require 'open-uri'
url = "http://fubar/song.mp3"
open(url, 'rb') do |mp3|
  File.open("local.mp3", 'wb') do |file|
    file.write(mp3.read)
  end
end

Don’t say you haven’t been warned. :)

February 12, 2009
3 thanks

Other regular-expression modifiers

Likewise you can set Regexp::IGNORECASE directly on the regexp with the literal syntax:

/first/i
# This will match "first", "First" and even "fiRSt"

Even more modifiers

  • o – Perform #{} interpolations only once, the first time the regexp literal is evaluated.

  • x – Ignores whitespace and allows comments in * regular expressions

  • u, e, s, n – Interpret the regexp as Unicode (UTF-8), EUC, SJIS, or ASCII. If none of these modifiers is specified, the regular expression is assumed to use the source encoding.

Literal to the rescue

Like string literals delimited with %Q, Ruby allows you to begin your regular expressions with %r followed by a delimiter of your choice.

This is useful when the pattern you are describing contains a lot of forward slash characters that you don’t want to escape:

%Q(http://)
# This will match "http://"
February 12, 2009
4 thanks

Literal syntax

As you propably know you can create an Array either with the constructor or the literal syntax:

Array.new == []
# => true

But there is also another nice and concise literal syntax for creating Arrays of Strings:

["one", "two", "three"] == %w[one two three]
# => true

You can use any kind of parenthesis you like after the %w, either (), [] or {}. I prefer the square brackets because it looks more like an array.

February 12, 2009
2 thanks

Use this!

You should raise your own ArgumentError in methods to notify users of your class, if you think certain kinds of arguments aren’t acceptable.

def transfer_money(amount)
  unless amount.is_a?(Number)
    raise ArgumentError.new("Only numbers are allowed")
  end
  # ... Do the actual work
end
February 12, 2009
3 thanks

Useful scenario

This can be quite useful, for example when writing a command line script which takes a number of options.

Example

Let’s say you want to make a script that can make the basic CRUD operations. So want to be able to call it like this from the command line:

> my_script create
> my_script delete

The following script allows you to use any abbreviated command as long as it is unambiguous.

# my_script.rb
require 'abbrev'

command = ARGV.first
actions = %w[create read update delete]
mappings = Abbrev::abbrev(actions)
puts mappings[command]

That means you can call it like this:

> my_script cr
> my_script d

And it will print:

create
delete
February 10, 2009
8 thanks

Security issue with non-HTML formats

Please note that using default to_xml or to_json methods can lead to security holes, as these method expose all attributes of your model by default, including salt, crypted_password, permissions, status or whatever you might have.

You might want to override these methods in your models, e.g.:

def to_xml
  super( :only => [ :login, :first_name, :last_name ] )
end

Or consider not using responds_to at all, if you only want to provide HTML.

February 10, 2009
0 thanks

Cheat Sheet

I have written a short introduction and a colorful cheat sheet for Perl Compatible Regular Expressions (PCRE) as used by Ruby’s Regexp class:

http://www.bitcetera.com/en/techblog/2008/04/01/regex-in-a-nutshell/

February 10, 2009
0 thanks

Cheat Sheet

I have written a short introduction and a colorful cheat sheet for Perl Compatible Regular Expressions (PCRE) as used by Ruby’s Regexp class:

http://www.bitcetera.com/en/techblog/2008/04/01/regex-in-a-nutshell/

February 10, 2009
3 thanks

Cheat Sheet

I have written a short introduction and a colorful cheat sheet for Perl Compatible Regular Expressions (PCRE) as used by Ruby’s Regexp class:

http://www.bitcetera.com/en/techblog/2008/04/01/regex-in-a-nutshell/

February 10, 2009
2 thanks
February 10, 2009
0 thanks

Output format

This outputs date & time in format of yyyy-MM-ddThh-mm-ssZZZ. All values are preceded with 0 if less than 10. Hours are in 0..23 range. Timezone is sticked at the end. Watch out for capital T in the middle :)

February 9, 2009
5 thanks
February 9, 2009
1 thank

:foreign_type option

I’m not sure if this has always been around but in 2.3, belongs_to takes a :foreign_type option on polymorphic associations. This behaves the same way as :foreign_key but for the type field.

February 9, 2009
2 thanks

Calculating on an enumerable

Inject can easily be used to sum an enumerable or to get the product of it

[100, 200, 1000].inject(0) { |sum, value| sum += value } # => 1300
[100, 200, 1000].inject(1) { |sum, value| sum *= value } # => 20000000

# You can access members and move down in the data structures, too
points.inject(0) { |sum, point| sum += point.y }

In the case of the first two examples, an easier way to do it in Ruby 1.9 is to use reduce:

[100, 200, 1000].reduce :+ # => 1300
[100, 200, 1000].reduce :* # => 20000000

Look at reduce for more examples on how to use this.

February 8, 2009
0 thanks

Can be used on classes, too

For example:

class C
  protected
    def foo
    end 
end
p C.protected_instance_methods(false)

outputs:

["foo"]
February 7, 2009 - (>= v2.2.1)
1 thank

Documentation

Good docs can be found here: http://www.artweb-design.de/2008/7/18/the-ruby-on-rails-i18n-core-api

See also: http://rails-i18n.org/wiki for an extensive list of resources.

February 7, 2009 - (>= v2.2.1)
3 thanks

Deprecated

This method is deprecated. You should use:

I18n.translate('activerecord.errors.messages')
February 6, 2009 - (>= v2.1.0)
1 thank

Whacky edge case

The above works great as long as you select the primary key of the owning assocations.

preload_associations calls a group_by on that object so if there is no primary key attributed filled out it will reduce the records to 1 object. ex: rows = foo.find(:all,:select=>“boo.id, foo.name, foo.age, count(DISTINCT foo.id)”, :group=>“foo.name,foo.age having count( DISTINCT foo.id) > 1”,:joins=>“INNER JOIN bar.foo on bar.foo_id = foo.id”)

preload_assications(rows,:bar)

rows.first.bar.name #=> sql call already made in preload rows.last.bar.name #=> just made another sql call to get bar

fix: :select=>“foo.id, boo.id, foo.name, foo.age, count(DISTINCT foo.id)”

now preload_associations will include all the ids found instead of just the 1st one.

February 5, 2009
1 thank

Weird method...

Takes three params:

- a Class constant (has to be an existing class)
- a "tag" param that, if set to "tag:yaml.org,2002:binary" will call unpack("m") on the third parameter, val; any other values for tag are ignored
- val can be a Hash or a String; if it's a string it is wrapped in a hash {'str' => val}, other wise...
  1. an instance of klass is allocated

  2. an instance of string is initialized, with the val parameter, and bound to the class context

  3. for each key in val (if any!), set instance variables in the instantiated class

So, what does this method do, a part from making my eyes hurt? It loads a yaml file and instantiates a class and sets the ivars found in the yaml file. Sorta.

It is probably the worst code I have ever seen in the ruby standard libs. WTF!!

:)